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My Brown skin means fighting to be heard.

My Brown skin means fighting to be seen.

My Brown skin means fighting to be known.

Do you hear the screams and cries of my Brown skin in cages?

Or are they drowned out by the color of our faces?

Did I do something wrong?

Why are you taking my mom?

Please remove the shackles on my feet

I can’t stop the bleeding- I promise to stop screaming

My Brown skin means fighting to be heard.

My Brown skin means fighting to be seen.

My Brown skin means fighting to be known.

Can you see the warrior in me?

Or are you afraid of what I can be?

My papi told me this dicho

“If you work really hard you will be accepted by the people”

He said it worked for mi abuelo

I think his name was Bracero

My Brown skin means fighting to be heard.

My Brown skin means fighting to be seen.

My Brown skin means fighting to be known.

Is my Brown skin not worth the fight?

After all, you taught me how to write

I read the books that you gave me

Now I can see why you hate me

My back is not wet

You stole this land- I hope you didn’t forget

My Brown skin means fighting to be heard.

My Brown skin means fighting to be seen.

My Brown skin means fighting to be known.

We are more than the beans and rice in your tortilla

Can you hear me and mi familia?

I will no longer walk this land invisible

I am led by my ancestors and their espiritu

I am no longer afraid to claim who I am

Porque mi barrio has a plan

My Brown skin means fighting to be heard.

My Brown skin means fighting to be seen.

My Brown skin means fighting to be known

Para mi gente ya no llores

Nosotros somos un jardín de flores

Aquí viene el día

They will hear us…

They will see us…

They will know us…

Jonathan Pérez

For over fifteen years, Jonathan has worked to assist young people and college students and adults develop racial consciousness by creating spaces for courageous conversations, and other opportunities to learn about the pervasive dynamics of racism while preparing them for action. Because of his journey, Jonathan has developed a strong belief that if racism is left unchecked, society will continue to see an increase of racially charged occurrences that impact success for students of color.

Jonathan believes that tomorrow's leaders are today’s students, and there can be no more important task than teaching them to address issues of racism head-on. Combining his education and lived experiences, from being a high school dropout to now serving as an educator, mentor, advocate, and leader in the community has prepared him to recognize and confront racism in our educational system and through institutional practices.

Jonathan is a doctoral candidate in Organizational Leadership at Abilene Christian University where he also completed his Master’s in Higher Education in 2015. In 2011, Jonathan completed his Bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas after transferring from Tarrant County College. Jonathan believes in the leadership style of servant leadership and enjoys helping people find pride in their cultural roots and tapping into their collective power. Jonathan was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, where he and his wife Geneva raise their children, Abigail and Jacob.